Water

Damage of Supreme Court Hirst Decision, Ecology, and Futurewise for Washingtonians

As CAPR enters our 14th year, we are reflecting on our many recent successes in our efforts to identify, educate, train, and mobilize property rights advocates, and to restore and defend property rights. Our ongoing efforts and successes in 2016 encourage us to keep working for the rights of all! Please help CAPR in this fight for freedom!

Hirst Decision by Supreme Court unleashes wrath of "Futurewise" upon property owners by taking their water

The recent Washington State Supreme Court decision Hirst vs. W. Washington Growth Management Hearings Board (“Hirst”) opens a new offensive against individual property rights and common sense; and it continues the trend of legislative rule making by our Supreme Court. The ruling is disastrous for property rights.  This is just part of the story.  The impacts are likely to be much greater than people realize.  There are actions you can take to make a difference.

The Skagit Basin In-stream Flow Rule - A Letter to the Department of Ecology

The following letter from Jacob and Wendy Tellberg to Department of Ecology Hydrologist and GIS Analyst John Rose provides further proof of the burden that the flawed Skagit Basin In-stream Flow Rule is causing citizens of our county. Like many others, Jake and Wendy continue to suffer serious financial harm in the aftermath of the 2013 Swinomish decision. Their property has been dramatically devalued and they are unable to do anything with it. Their retirement plans are in complete disarray.

Seeking Justice by Electing Justices Who Respect the Constitution and the Rule of Law

Many persons seek the protection of their property rights and relief from over-reaching or misapplied regulatory actions and want to have that relief from our Judicial system.  But what if the highest court in our State has strayed from the rule of law and constitutional decision making and into the arena of problem solving with decisions best left to another branch of government, the legislature? 

Putting Pot in Its Place

At 7:00 pm on the evening of August 24th well over 80 concerned citizens attended a meeting at the Wabash Church meeting room in Auburn, rural King County.  They came to meet and discuss their grievances with the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (WSLCB). The list of objections from rural property owners are the core questions regarding property values, and neighborhood safety.

One Woman's Tale of Disappointment and Loss in Skagit County

Citizens in many places of Washington State are under attack from elected officials and unelected bureaucrats in Olympia.  Often, these individuals, who are supposed to be servants of the people, are instead servants of special interests, especially the environmental NGO's and the tribes who contribute generously to campaign coffers and get a hefty return on investment with preferencial treatment, advantageous legislation and administrative regulations, and favorable court rulings.   This favorable treatment often results in significant financial harm and shattered dreams to the people who live outside the urban areas in and around metropolitan Seattle. 

King County Dumps the “Turd Tax” after Overwhelming Rejection by Angry Citizens!

After experiencing standing room only crowds at every previous hearing on this subject, King County wisely changed venues to the Snoqualmie Valley Alliance Church just outside Fall City.  Despite being one of the largest venues in the area, overflow crowds packed the church with at least 500 people in the main room, a packed balcony, a filled hallway, and people crowding into every place they could fit.  Speakers were turned on in the lobby so that those unable to enter the main room could still listen.

Be There or Be Taxed! Come to Fall City to Speak Out on Septic System "Fees"

Make sure you attend this last meeting so King County officials can hear what you think about being blamed for pollution with your septic system.  We all know septic systems are far superior to the municipal combined sewer storm water overflows that so often pollute the Puget Sound.

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